Beginners Guide to Buying a Telescope

Join me on Facebook live on Sunday 29th November at 7pm for a talk and presentation on choosing and buying your first telescope.

Buying a telescope can be daunting and you’ll want to make the best choice possible for your budget and needs.

During the talk I’ll aim to answer several common questions, including:

1. How much should I spend?

2. How large is practical for my requirements?

3. What can I expect to see through different sizes of scope?

4. Can you recommend a good starter kit & some good telescopes to choose from?

PLUS an introduction to Stargazing, Binocular Observing and a What’s Up guide for December skies, including Mars, Venus, Jupiter, Saturn and more..

This talk is hosted as part of the the Inverness Nature Reserve Astronomy evenings but is open to all. We would kindly ask you to purchase an online ticket from Eventbrite by way of a donation to the astronomy programme and the Nature Reserve. I’m sure you’ll understand that times are tough for outreach at the moment so your help will be greatly appreciated. Please purchase your ticket in advance here.

Beginners Astronomy Kit

Yesterday I presented my beginners guide to observing and buying a first telescope at the Inverness Urban Astronomy gathering.  Here is my 2020 recommendations for good starter equipment.

1. Binoculars: 8x40s or 10x50s. Prices from £50 for decent ones. I personally use Olympus DSP1s and we’ve purchased these for both the Abriachan and Merkinch outreach programmes.

707c9267-04e8-4e9f-bca3-cbe1dd6febce_LongestEdge2048

2. Telescope: Skywatcher 150mm or 200mm dobsonian. Simple to use with great performance. Prices from £175. Get the 200mm if you have the space and extra cash to spend.

Skyliner200ful

3. Books: Left Turn at Orion and Stargazing for Dummies. From £15 each.

 

4. A red light LED headtorch. From £6 if you go to Tesco’s. Up to £30 for a good quality one.

petzl-tikka-head-torch-bf

5. A planisphere. They cost around £10 and can be found in good book stores.

8110801

Of all the items above I’d say binoculars are the most important.  People are often surprised to discover I do over 90% of my observing with a simple pair of 8x40s.  You can read an earlier post on the merits of hand held astronomy here.