June 10th Solar Eclipse

Re-sharing some of the wonderful solar eclipse images posted to the community section of my Facebook page today.

Thank you so much for sharing and joining the marathon livestream earlier today, which had a reach of over a quarter of a million on Facebook.

Inverness turned out to be one of the best places to see today’s partial solar eclipse.

You can watch the livestream again here: https://fb.watch/61U_F2KS9d/

Partial Solar Eclipse Live (June 10th)

Join me live to *fingers crossed* observe a partial solar eclipse of the Sun. Weather permitting, I’ll be streaming views live via telescope and hosting some interactive chat and Q&A.

Rough eclipse times on June 10th:

Start: 10.08am
Maximum eclipse: 11.20am
End: 12.34 noon

You can join the stream from around 10.30am on my Facebook page here.

Safety: Please remember to never observe the Sun without proper eye protection. Solar glasses are needed to observe naked eye and proper objective mounted filters or projection should be used to observe it in binoculars or telescope.

Partial Solar Eclipse 10th June 2021

Mark your diaries for a partial Solar Eclipse on the morning of 10th June 2021 (beginning 10am), visible from many parts of northern Europe.

In the north of Scotland up to 32% of the Sun’s disk will be occulted by the Moon, dropping to 25% in the south of England.


I’ll hopefully be live streaming views of the eclipse from my facebook page so look out for the event links going up soon as well as guides for viewing it safely.

Stargazing and Partial Lunar Eclipse over Snowdonia

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The Plough asterism, part of Ursa Major

I had the privilege of visiting Snowdonia this summer for a family camp in a beautiful river valley near Maentwrog.  During the evenings I managed a bit of stargazing before moonrise and captured a few bright constellations over the Welsh hills.

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Cassiopeia over the Welsh hills

I also captured a lovely close pairing between the Moon and the planet Jupiter.

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Jupiter sits serenely below the waxing gibbous Moon

The highlight, however, was witnessing a beautiful partial eclipse of the Moon on Tuesday evening at around 11pm.

I took these pictures and a short video using my smartphone anchored to a simple pair of 8×40 binoculars (mounted for stability).  The eclipse was already underway when the Moon rose into view and continued until well after midnight.

 

Total Lunar Eclipse 21st January 2019

Look out for a spectacular total lunar eclipse next Monday 21st January, when the full Moon will turn blood red in the sky.  I’ve put together a video guide below with details of the timings for the full event at northern GMT latitudes.

You’ll have to get up early in the morning on the 21st to witness totality, with the best observing times spanning 4.42am – 5.45am.  Set your alarms!

The last total lunar eclipse was only 5 months ago, when I photographed the red Moon briefly emerging from clouds.

Big thanks to Kay Nakayama of Chillscape Art & Music for the accompanying music.

Total Lunar Eclipse

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This Friday (the 27th of July) the Moon will rise into view in the south east around 9.30pm with an unusual red colour. This is due to a rare phenomena known as total lunar eclipse – when the Earth sits directly between the Moon and the Sun.

But why doesn’t the Moon darken if its light supply is cut off by the Earth, and why will it turn a red colour?

The best way to think about this is to imagine yourself standing on the surface of the Moon as the Earth slowly passes in front of the Sun.

As the disc of the Earth begins to occult the Sun it will start to darken until finally the whole of the Earth sits in front of the Sun. But as this takes place something amazing happens. The Earth’s atmosphere refracts the sunlight into an intense circle of vibrant sunset. It’s this ring of fire around the Earth that illuminates the Moon during totality, giving it an eerie red colour.

This far north between 9.30pm and 10.30pm it’ll still be pretty bright outside but the colour change should still be obvious to see. As the evening progresses the eclipse will become partial and will be almost over by midnight.

Totality for this lunar eclipse will be 103 minutes making it the longest in this century. As my animation below shows we won’t be able to witness the start of this eclipse, only its middle and end.

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Times:

Peak Eclipse 9.21pm
Moonrise (at 57 deg north) 9.35pm
Total eclipse ends 10.13pm
Partial eclipse ends 11.19pm
Eclipse ends 12.28am

Clear skies and happy Moon watching!