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Cosmology, Astronomy and Abstract Mathematics


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Mercury Opportunity

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Mercury is only 40% larger than the moon but very difficult to spot

The planet Mercury can be very tricky to observe.  It’s close proximity to the sun means we generally only have brief opportunities to observe it low on the horizon either before or after sunset.

Right now Mercury is approaching maximum eastern elongation (on March 15th to be precise) meaning the planet is up for longer after the sun sets.  The window is still pretty brief with only about 45 mins of useful time to work with after sunset.

Your best chance is to pick a clear evening and head out somewhere with a good unobstructed view to the West.  You don’t need dark skies as the Sun will still be producing a lot of light between 6 and 8pm.

At the moment, and at Highland latitudes, the action starts about 6.30pm just after the Sun sets.  Wait a while then scan the western horizon and you should see Venus first, which will appear brighter.  Use this as a guide for finding Mercury which will sit slightly above it over the next few days.

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6.20pm 14th March 2018, 57 degrees north

The longer you wait after the sunset the easier Mercury will be to see due to darkening skies but also harder due to it moving lower and lower towards the horizon, adding more atmospheric distortion to your views.

If you do see it take a note of its crescent phase.  We almost always see Mercury as a crescent because it would be too close to the sun to see it in a full or new aspect.  One exception to this is during a solar transit when Mercury crosses directly across the disc of the sun.  The next opportunity to witness this will be 11th November 2019, which gives you plenty of time to prepare a solar filter for safe observing of the solar disc.  Happy planet hunting meanwhile.

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Transits reveal the true scale of the Sun


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The Geminids

One of the most energetic meteor showers of the year is fast approaching with activity predicted between Dec 4th – Dec 16th. With the best possible observing conditions the Geminids can produce displays of up to 120 meteors per hour, although you’ll likely see rates much lower than this in reality.

Occasionally and unpredictably, meteor showers can erupt into storms. One of the most famous ‘storms’ happened in 1833 when the Leonids produced over 100,000 meteors per hour! Who knows what this December will bring.

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Observing Meteor Showers

You don’t need any special equipment to view a meteor shower, in fact binoculars or telescopes will just narrow your field of view. Grab a deck chair or a warm blanket, prepare a hot drink, wrap up warm and lay out under the darkest conditions you can find. It’s an excellent activity to do alone or if you have children they’ll love an excuse to get outside for some after dark play.

Put away any lights or bright mobile phones and simply look up and wait. Remember it takes up to 30 minutes for your eyes to fully dark adapt and any exposure to bright lights will start the process all over again. If you need a light red touches are best for preserving you night vision.

Good luck and clear skies!

 

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